Vladmir Yevgrafovich Tatlin (Vladmir Tatlin), The Corner Counter Relief, Wood, Copper, Wire Sculpture, The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, 1914-1915, Russian Constructivism.

Vladmir Yevgrafovich Tatlin (Vladmir Tatlin), The Corner Counter Relief, Wood, Copper, Wire Sculpture, The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, 1914-1915, Russian Constructivism.
Vladmir Tatlin was known to be the laboratory Constructivist as he gained his basic knowledge from Pablo Picasso and also by practicing the creation of objects through sculpture and architecture. This is a painting using his construction tools hence the counter the relief of the surrounding place. He created a series of these works so that they could juxtapose their mere existence in their original form. The tools he uses and the flat surfaces around him are clearly opposed within the sculpture. The pieces of work in the sculpture do not exceed to unbounding space but express the idea behind the structure within the space it took up. The diagonal wires you see that are running across are evocative of a musical instrument and could have been inspired by Tatlin’s experience as a musical instrument maker.
This sculpture is a clear use from the painting before it from the series of Counter Reliefs. The corner is added to this sculpture, as it was located in the corner of the room, which was a religious icon to him, and so was the material used. All these materials and composition evoked religious ideals in a pious Russian household. These materials draw attention to the surface texture involved in the sculpture and the extensions in different directions add to the sculpture rhythm and dynamism. There is dynamic modernity involved in the sculpture shown as the reason for the experimentation with the material as a reflection to be Russia’s new gods.
“The idea is something that may have come from the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Sculpture (1912), a volume by the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni, in which he calls on sculptors, “Let’s split open our figures and place the environment inside them.” “
(Cordray)
Lastly I would like to conclude with a quote by Vladmir Tatlin about Constructivism as a movement and how he perceived art which well explains his thought and significance behind the work.  
In the squares and in the streets we are placing our work convinced that art must not remain a sanctuary for the idle, a consolation for the weary, and a justification for the lazy. Art should attend us everywhere that life flows and acts.”— Vladimir Tatlin
Cordray, Julian. “Vladmir Tatlin Biography, Art, and Analysis of the Work.” The ArtStory.Org. The Art Story Organization. Web. 24 Apr 2013. <http://www.theartstory.org/artist-tatlin-vladimir.htm>.

This sculpture is a clear use from the painting before it from the series of Counter Reliefs. The corner is added to this sculpture, as it was located in the corner of the room, which was a religious icon to him, and so was the material used. All these materials and composition evoked religious ideals in a pious Russian household. These materials draw attention to the surface texture involved in the sculpture and the extensions in different directions add to the sculpture rhythm and dynamism. There is dynamic modernity involved in the sculpture shown as the reason for the experimentation with the material as a reflection to be Russia’s new gods.
“The idea is something that may have come from the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Sculpture (1912), a volume by the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni, in which he calls on sculptors, “Let’s split open our figures and place the environment inside them.” “
(Cordray)
Lastly I would like to conclude with a quote by Vladmir Tatlin about Constructivism as a movement and how he perceived art which well explains his thought and significance behind the work.  
In the squares and in the streets we are placing our work convinced that art must not remain a sanctuary for the idle, a consolation for the weary, and a justification for the lazy. Art should attend us everywhere that life flows and acts.”— Vladimir Tatlin
Cordray, Julian. “Vladmir Tatlin Biography, Art, and Analysis of the Work.” The ArtStory.Org. The Art Story Organization. Web. 24 Apr 2013. <http://www.theartstory.org/artist-tatlin-vladimir.htm>.

Vladmir Yevgrafovich Tatlin (Vladmir Tatlin), The Corner Counter Relief, Wood, Copper, Wire Sculpture, The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, 1914-1915, Russian Constructivism.

Vladmir Yevgrafovich Tatlin (Vladmir Tatlin), The Corner Counter Relief, Wood, Copper, Wire Sculpture, The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, 1914-1915, Russian Constructivism.

Vladmir Tatlin was known to be the laboratory Constructivist as he gained his basic knowledge from Pablo Picasso and also by practicing the creation of objects through sculpture and architecture. This is a painting using his construction tools hence the counter the relief of the surrounding place. He created a series of these works so that they could juxtapose their mere existence in their original form. The tools he uses and the flat surfaces around him are clearly opposed within the sculpture. The pieces of work in the sculpture do not exceed to unbounding space but express the idea behind the structure within the space it took up. The diagonal wires you see that are running across are evocative of a musical instrument and could have been inspired by Tatlin’s experience as a musical instrument maker.

This sculpture is a clear use from the painting before it from the series of Counter Reliefs. The corner is added to this sculpture, as it was located in the corner of the room, which was a religious icon to him, and so was the material used. All these materials and composition evoked religious ideals in a pious Russian household. These materials draw attention to the surface texture involved in the sculpture and the extensions in different directions add to the sculpture rhythm and dynamism. There is dynamic modernity involved in the sculpture shown as the reason for the experimentation with the material as a reflection to be Russia’s new gods.

“The idea is something that may have come from the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Sculpture (1912), a volume by the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni, in which he calls on sculptors, “Let’s split open our figures and place the environment inside them.” “

(Cordray)

Lastly I would like to conclude with a quote by Vladmir Tatlin about Constructivism as a movement and how he perceived art which well explains his thought and significance behind the work.  

In the squares and in the streets we are placing our work convinced that art must not remain a sanctuary for the idle, a consolation for the weary, and a justification for the lazy. Art should attend us everywhere that life flows and acts.”— Vladimir Tatlin

Cordray, Julian. “Vladmir Tatlin Biography, Art, and Analysis of the Work.” The ArtStory.Org. The Art Story Organization. Web. 24 Apr 2013. <http://www.theartstory.org/artist-tatlin-vladimir.htm>.

This sculpture is a clear use from the painting before it from the series of Counter Reliefs. The corner is added to this sculpture, as it was located in the corner of the room, which was a religious icon to him, and so was the material used. All these materials and composition evoked religious ideals in a pious Russian household. These materials draw attention to the surface texture involved in the sculpture and the extensions in different directions add to the sculpture rhythm and dynamism. There is dynamic modernity involved in the sculpture shown as the reason for the experimentation with the material as a reflection to be Russia’s new gods.

“The idea is something that may have come from the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Sculpture (1912), a volume by the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni, in which he calls on sculptors, “Let’s split open our figures and place the environment inside them.” “

(Cordray)

Lastly I would like to conclude with a quote by Vladmir Tatlin about Constructivism as a movement and how he perceived art which well explains his thought and significance behind the work.  

In the squares and in the streets we are placing our work convinced that art must not remain a sanctuary for the idle, a consolation for the weary, and a justification for the lazy. Art should attend us everywhere that life flows and acts.”— Vladimir Tatlin

Cordray, Julian. “Vladmir Tatlin Biography, Art, and Analysis of the Work.” The ArtStory.Org. The Art Story Organization. Web. 24 Apr 2013. <http://www.theartstory.org/artist-tatlin-vladimir.htm>.

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